Field Guide to ParaMagic
Tales of joy, sadness, and the occassional insight into the world of the EMT/Paramedic student.
Field Guide to ParaMagic
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Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

The AAA is a relatively common, potentially life-threatening condition. It has a wide spectrum of presentations and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a number of symptoms. 

Prehospital care includes initiation of airway and breathing support as necessary. 

Initiation of two large-bore intravenous lines with isotonic fluid. 

Transport to a facility with rapid surgical ability is warranted.

Local protocol and medical direction should be followed.
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Possible Appendicitis is a True Medical Emergency 

The classic symptoms of appendicitis include:

•Dull pain near the navel or the upper or lower abdomen that becomes sharp as it moves to the lower right abdomen. This is usually the first sign. (At point labeled 1 called McBurney’s Point)
•Loss of appetite
•Nausea and/or vomiting soon after abdominal pain begins
•Abdominal swelling
•Temperature of 99 to 102 degrees
•Constipation or diarrhea with gas
•Inability to pass gas

Almost half the time, other symptoms appear, including:
•Dull or sharp pain anywhere in the upper or lower abdomen, back, or rectum
•Painful urination
•Vomiting that precedes the abdominal pain

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The few that I have seen in patients occurred right after a meal
Possible Appendicitis is a True Medical Emergency 

The classic symptoms of appendicitis include:

•Dull pain near the navel or the upper or lower abdomen that becomes sharp as it moves to the lower right abdomen. This is usually the first sign. (At point labeled 1 called McBurney’s Point)
•Loss of appetite
•Nausea and/or vomiting soon after abdominal pain begins
•Abdominal swelling
•Temperature of 99 to 102 degrees
•Constipation or diarrhea with gas
•Inability to pass gas

Almost half the time, other symptoms appear, including:
•Dull or sharp pain anywhere in the upper or lower abdomen, back, or rectum
•Painful urination
•Vomiting that precedes the abdominal pain

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The few that I have seen in patients occurred right after a meal
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Ordinarily, carbon dioxide is not poisonous. It diffuses from your cells into your bloodstream and from there out via your lungs, yet it is always present throughout your body.
However, if you breathe high concentrations of carbon dioxide or re-breathe air (such as from a plastic bag or tent), you may be at risk for carbon dioxide intoxication or even carbon dioxide poisoning. Carbon dioxide intoxication and carbon dioxide poisoning are independent of oxygen concentration, so you may have enough oxygen present to support life, yet still suffer from the effects of rising carbon dioxide concentration in your blood and tissues.
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The Q wave is the first negative deflection after the p wave. If the Q wave is greater than 25% of the R wave than that means there is a high probability that the patient is having or has had a cardiac ischemic event in that area (as you probably know each lead looks at a different part of the ventricle) now to tell the difference between is having or has had an ischemic event look at the s-t segment. If it is at the baseline chances are it is an old MI. If you have elevation or depression your patient is currently suffering from a cardiac event.
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paramedicpixie:

My kid knows this all too well.
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paramedicpixie:

National Registry question number 1
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necessaryhealth:

By Column Five Media
on June 15, 2011
With hundreds of medical terms to memorize, aspiring health professionals need to undertand common medical prefixes and postfixes. This infographic explores common medical prefixes and postfixes and their meaning.
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Came into the hospital in serious but stable condition
Came into the hospital in serious but stable condition